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With more time on my hands these days, this gives me something to do. I hope you get some pleasure, along with me, in sharing this new stage of my life.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Four Nights on Kangaroo Island South Australia. Day Five - 3rd May.

   
Today was spent in Flinders Chase National Park, re-visiting the Remarkable Rocks (in daylight) and also seeing Cape du Couedic Lighthouse and Admirals Arch. The conditions for the sunset at Admirals Arch were just about perfect and we had the most fantastic light show. We also tried to get to the Cape Borda Lighthouse, at the north western tip of the park, but the dirt roads were not suited to the car we had and we had to turn around. 


The road through the National Park.
At night there wasn't much room to negotiate around the wildlife that hop out of the under-story.

The walkway down to Admirals Arch, with the Casuarina Islets (The Brothers) in the background at Cape du Couedic.

Admirals Arch.
Like last night at the Remarkable Rocks, we were the only ones here (plus the seals).

Admirals Arch





Admirals Arch and Fur Seals.



Fur Seal doing push ups.


Admirals Arch


The walkway had a covering of this mossy type growth.

Fur Seals below the walkway.



 Cape du Couedic Lighthouse.

Conditions would have been harsh for these men who built the lighthouse in 1909.

Life is a little easier these days.

 Cape du Couedic Lighthouse.

 Cape du Couedic Lighthouse.
(photo enhanced)

Remarkable Rocks in the daylight.
Remarkable Rocks.

More people than last night.
Remarkable Rocks.

Why are these rocks like they are?.............nature does strange things.
Remarkable Rocks.

Remarkable Rocks dwarf  Lynn. (no, not 'and' dwarf Lynn).

"Please don't eat me"
Remarkable Rocks.

Remarkable Rocks.
(photo enhanced)


Remarkable Rocks.
(photo enhanced)

Looking back towards Cape du Couedic

These people decided to hog the limelight by having their lunch on the rock out of the cool breeze.
Remarkable Rocks.

Remarkable Rocks with rock huggers.
(photo enhanced)

Remarkable Rocks.

Dog Rock or Howling Hound.
Remarkable Rocks.

Remarkable Rocks.
Some pose like this..........
..........and some pose like this.
Remarkable Rocks.


Descending the Remarkable Rocks.

Baby 'Remarkables'.

As we leave, the crowds start to roll in.
Remarkable Rocks.

Ruins of the old storerooms.

These are the original stores that supplied the lighthouse. At the time of construction the site was inaccessible by land so Weirs Cove, 1 mile north of lighthouse site, was selected for landing. A jetty built first had to be constructed so stores and building materials could be landed. At first these stores, materials and equipment were carried up a zig zag path hewn into the face of the 300 foot (92 metre) cliff which continued until a flying fox was operative. To power the flying fox originally a pair of horses were used , but were later replaced by a motorised winch. Steps were also carved in to the cutting to give foot access.

The old cutting where the supplies were lifted by flying fox from the wharf below.

The wharf.

Looking from the old stores back to the lighthouse.

And looking back the in the other direction towards the Remarkable Rocks.

Lifeless Fingers in the Heath.
(photo enhanced)

We went on a walk around the visitors centre hoping to find a Koala. One of the early pioneer family.

A Kangaroo has his lunch interrupted.





Cape Barren Geese sorting out territories.



Cape Barren Goose. 

We had walked past this one but were taken back to see it by 2 people from Sweden.





Koala climbing to a better spot.



Lynn taking some people from Japan to see the Koala that the Swedes had shown us.

Maybe the giant prehistoric fauna were made extinct by the Cape Barren Geese?

The magpies had a different pattern to our local ones.

The road to Cape Borda was a bit too rough for "zorro' the i30, so we had to turn back. In hindsight that was a good thing as we would have probably  missed that nights sunset.

Kangaroo Island Silver Bush  (Adenanthos macropodianus) was a new species for me.

A long shadow is cast by this Tammar Wallaby as the sun sets at the Cape du Couedic  car park. 

The setting sun illuminates the boardwalk down to Admirals Arch.

It's starting to look good, this might just work.

Making sure the camera is tuned on.



Nothing like a swim after you have been in the ocean all day.






Seal pup looking for mum.




Pacific Gull looking for a feed, and a seal pup has a feed.



Mr 'Grumpy Rock' thinks we are too late.

My brother Les gave me the tip after someone had told him that you can sometimes get the glow of the setting sun through the arch.

Well this was just a little more than a 'glow'.
Sunset at Admirals Arch.

Sunset at Admirals Arch.

We didn't really expect this.
Sunset at Admirals Arch.

Sunset at Admirals Arch.

Sunset at Admirals Arch.

Sunset at Admirals Arch.

Sunset at Admirals Arch.
It was hard to leave.

Looking east towards Remarkable Rocks.

Everyone else was leaving...................

...............so it was also time for us to leave and say, "good night".



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